The CSA: a more climate-proof food source

You get better food,
and better food security.

CSA basket

As national food supplies may become less reliable from the impacts of climate change, establishing a local food source is predicted to be increasingly important in lowering your food costs. The Community Supported Agriculture program (CSA) has become a popular way for consumers to buy seasonal food at a less cost directly from their local farmer. Stimulate your local economy, eat better, save money.

CSAs are a locally-based model of agriculture and food distribution. Members or subscribers join up with an independent farm and pay for a share of their anticipated harvest. Customers receive a fresh-picked box of produce regularly (usually weekly) throughout the growing season.

The average item on your supermarket shelf travels 1,500 miles from farm to plate. Imagine what increased drought, dropping aquifer levels, and more intense storms will be doing to your food sources in California, Texas or Kansas over coming years. Developing a relationship with your local farmer can help reduce those risks. Last year, full share members of Spring Creek Farm’s CSA program in Palmer, Alaska saved about $150 due to a bountiful growing season. This doesn’t account for the additional savings in shipping and packaging these members saved from buying directly from their local farmer. Now there's some food for thought.

Do you want to secure a supply of fresh local food, while boosting your local farmer's financial stability with advance payment? Find your local CSA and learn more about the idea at LocalHarvest.org.

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